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HealthVoices

HealthVoices: Healthcare Survey Results

Implementation of major components of The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) has been underway for over a year. Georgia residents have begun to experience the impact of this historic federal legislation, and the state of Georgia has made key policy decisions about different components of the law. The purpose of this issue of HealthVoices is to provide a snapshot of how Georgians feel about their current healthcare, and how they view these state level policy decisions one year following ACA implementation.

Recommended Citation: Healthcare Survey Results, Beth Schapiro, PhD, President, The Schapiro Group, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Issue 1, 2014, Publication #90, October 2014.

HealthVoices: Health Advocacy 101: How Do I...Become a Successful Advocate?

Politicians and government representatives listen to their constituents, and when done well, advocacy can be an important tool for influencing a decision maker. This issue of HealthVoices is a “How to” brief is designed to be a handy resource for people interested in becoming effective advocates for an organization or issue. It contains useful web site addresses for the legislative and executive offices at the state and federal levels, along with techniques and tips for successful advocacy.

Recommended Citation: HealthVoices: Health Advocacy 101: How Do I...Become a Successful Advocate?, Scott Maxwell, Mathews & Maxwell, Inc., Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Issue 3, 2013, Publication #79, December 2013.

HealthVoices: Healthcare Access Survey Results

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is now the law of the land. This issue of HealthVoices provides a snapshot of how Georgians feel about their current healthcare and how they view health reform as implementation begins. The issue also highlights how Georgians access healthcare, how they feel about the services they receive, and the implications of the implementation of the ACA.

Recommended Citation: Healthcare Access Survey Results, Beth Schapiro, PhD, President and Rusty Parker, PhD, Senior Strategist, The Schapiro Group, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Issue 2, 2013, Publication #78, September 2013.

HealthVoices: Medicaid Expansion in Georgia

This issue of HealthVoices, Medicaid Expansion in Georgia, provides more information on who could be covered if the state opts to expand in January 2014, including examining the age, racial, ethnic, employment status, and geographic makeup of the newly eligible population. The brief also highlights the effect that expanding access to Medicaid will have on low-income and generally uninsured adults and workers.

Recommended Citation: HealthVoices: Medicaid Expansion in Georgia, Tim Sweeney, MPA, Director of Health Policy, Georgia Budget and Policy Institute, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Issue 1, 2013, Publication #75, June 2013.

Successful Advocacy at the State Legislature (Part 2 of 2)

This issue of HealthVoices is part two of a two-part series designed to provide a direct-from-the-trenches perspective on what every advocate needs to know about working with the Georgia General Assembly. Highlights include: the state budget and timeline, the legislative process, the committee process, the governor’s role, and how to follow the development of the budget through online tracking. Part one of this series features the importance of building trusted, truthful relationships, what happens when a bill goes to committee, understanding the “issues” process and the nuances of the Georgia General Assembly. Both publications can be found at www.healthcaregeorgia.org.

Recommended Citation: HealthVoices: Successful Advocacy at the State Legislature, Scott Maxwell, Mathews & Maxwell, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Issue 3, 2012, Publication #69, October 2012.

HealthVoices: Nonprofit Hospital Community Benefits

Approximately 82 percent of Georgia’s hospitals are nonprofit entities, meaning these facilities have particular obligations to their communities due to forgone tax revenue. In exchange for those exemptions, federal law requires that communities receive from their hospitals certain programs and activities that promote health, healing and community wellness.

This issue of HealthVoices examines the potential impact of community benefits on Georgians, their hospitals and their communities.

Recommended Citation: Nonprofit Hospital Community Benefits, Holly Lang, Hospital Accountability Project Director, Georgia Watch, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Publication #55, October 2011

HealthVoices: Reflections on Philanthropy: Grounded in Science, Built on Partnerships, and Focused on Results

Like many states in our nation, Georgia has too often faltered in efforts to measurably improve the health of its residents. Attention to health and health care issues has never been greater, nor so urgently needed in this country.This issue of HealthVoices reflects on lessons learned during Healthcare Georgia Foundation’s ten-year pursuit of its mission and the importance of engaging in the robust discussion of these issues, especially at the community level.

Recommended Citation: Reflections on Philanthropy: Grounded in Science, Build on Partnerships and Focused on Results, Gary D. Nelson, PhD, president, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Publication #53, May 2011

HealthVoices: Return on Investment Analysis: A Key to Nonprofit Health Organizations

When considering the investment of limited resources to delivery primary and tertiary care, decision makers are often required to study the “business case” or financial impact of a new delivery of care system. As a result, return on investment (ROI) has been gaining popularity in health care. This issue of HealthVoices examines how health care organizations or nearly free primary care in their communities can use ROI analysis to effectively demonstrate and communicate to stakeholders the economic returns on their resources expended.

Recommended Citation: HealthVoices: ROI and Free Clinics in Georgia,Phaedra Corso, PhD, MPA, Angela Fertig, PhD,University of Georgia College of Public Health,Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Publication #51, January 2011

HealthVoices: Financial Assistance at Hospitals

Financial assistance is a crucial component of access to quality health care. By law, consumers must be notified through clear and easy-to-understand visual and written alerts that financial assistance is available, and be given the option through various points of their hospital experience to apply for aid. This issue of HealthVoices explores the matter of hospital financial assistance and the needs and protections of low income Georgians.

Recommended Citation: HealthVoices: Financial Assistance at Hospitals, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Georgia Hospital Accountability Project, Publication #49, December 2010.

HealthVoices: Health Reform in Georgia: Perception or Reality?

On March 23, 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordability Act was passed and health reform became law, and with it along the way, emotional and heavily politicized debate. In the fall of 2009 and on behalf of Healthcare Georgia Foundation, The University of Georgia’s Survey Research Center conducted a survey of 500 Georgia residents comprised of questions related to health care access, cost, and quality. This issue of HealthVoices highlights those results and the importance of timely, effective, and well-financed health communications, both prior to, and following the passage of the law.

Recommended Citation: HealthVoices, "Health Reform in Georgia: Perception or Reality?", University of Georgia Survey Research Center, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Publication #44, August 2010

HealthVoices: Together We Can Do Better: Creating a 21st Century Public Health System for Georgians

Georgia’s current investments in prevention and public health reflect a decade of declines, despite being the ninth largest state in economic output. Since 2000, the state’s population has increased by 20 percent, yet per capita spending for the public health system has decreased by 21 percent. This issue of HealthVoices highlights the consequences of this neglect, Georgians’ support for strong public health, and recommendations for reversing the trend. It also features the Foundation’s ongoing collaborative public health campaign, Partner Up! For Public Health (www.togetherwecandobetter.com).

Recommended Citation: HealthVoices: “Together We Can Do Better: Creating a 21st Century Public Health System for Georgians,” Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Publication #43, August 2010

HealthVoices: The Mental Health System in Georgia: The Perfect Storm

Mental disorders represent a significant health burden and have profound effects on a range of diseases and health conditions. They are equal opportunity disorders, with broad population disparities identified in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. This issue of HealthVoices addresses public perceptions of mental health issues in Georgia in the context of recent federal legislation and Georgia’s current crisis in the structure, delivery, and financing of these services.

Recommended Citation: HealthVoices: The Mental Health System in Georgia: The Perfect Storm, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, The Schapiro Group, Publication #45, September 2010

HealthVoices: Achieving Greater Health Equity: Georgians Support Workforce Diversity

A recent Healthcare Georgia Foundation poll sought to learn Georgian’s views on the importance of a diverse health care workforce and its role in addressing health disparities in the state. This issue of HealthVoices highlights the findings of that poll to amplify the voices of health consumers and their views on ways to improve access to affordable, high quality health care. The poll was conducted by the Survey Research Center at the University of Georgia.

Recommended Citation: HealthVoices: “Achieving Greater Health Equity: Georgians Support Workforce Diversity,” Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Publication #30, January 2009

HealthVoices: Trauma Care in Georgia: Georgians are Willing to Pay for a Statewide System

Trauma Care in Georgia: Georgians are Willing to Pay for a Statewide System For the second year, a statewide survey shows that Georgians overwhelmingly favor building a statewide trauma system that would save as many as 700 lives each year – and that they are willing to pay for the system. This issue of HealthVoices summarizes the findings of the December 2007 poll by the Survey Research Center at the University of Georgia which found that two-thirds of Georgians are willing to pay $25 or more a year for a statewide trauma system.

The Follow-Up Report and Trauma Data can be found here

OP ED: Trauma care worth it to voters  (Atlanta Journal Constitution, 03/05/08)

Gary D. Nelson, PhD
President
Healthcare Georgia Foundation


Recommended Citation: HealthVoices: "Trauma Care in Georgia: Georgians are Willing to Pay for Statewide System," Healthcare Georgia Foundation,Publication #23, February 2008

HealthVoices: Home and Community-based Services: A Robust, Rational and Ready System for Georgians

Providing home and community-based services (HCBS) to serve the elderly and people with disabilities – now and in the future – is one of the major health and social challenges confronting Georgians. This policy brief summarizes the findings of a review of HCBS in Georgia conducted in 2006 by Ann Rosewater in collaboration with the Georgia State University School of Social Work, with support from Healthcare Georgia Foundation.

The brief identifies important innovations that would enhance access to quality, affordable home and community-based services and contribute to creating a more robust and responsive long-term care system.

Recommended Citation: HealthVoices: "Home and Community-based Services: A Robust, Rational and Ready System for Georgians," Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Publication #20, July 2007

HealthVoices: Trauma Care in Georgia: Overburdened Underfunded and Fragmented

Getting the right patient to the right hospital at the right time would save the lives of approximately 700 Georgians each year. Yet, Georgia is served by only 15 trauma centers, with four level one trauma centers located in metropolitan areas, and does not have a comprehensive, coordinated statewide trauma system.

This issue of HealthVoices features the results of a statewide public opinion poll on trauma care conducted in December 2006. The survey, executed on behalf of Healthcare Georgia Foundation by the University of Georgia Survey Research Center found that Georgians overwhelming support the creation and funding of a world-class trauma care system, one that serves both urban and rural areas.

The Summary Tables, Methods and Procedures, and Trauma Data can be found here.


Recommended Citation: HealthVoices: "Trauma Care in Georgia: Overburdened Underfunded and Fragmented", The Survey Research Center at the University of Georgia , Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Publication #15, January 2007

HealthVoices: Health Literacy - A Key to Better Health for Georgians

The inability to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services prevents over 2 million adults in Georgia from taking the right prescription drugs, making doctor's appointments, and completing health insurance forms. This issue of HealthVoices examines the causes and consequences of low health literacy, who is most at risk, and which efforts have been most successful in Georgia.

The brief was prepared by Julie Gazmararian PhD, Kara Jacobson MPH, and David Howard PhD, of the Emory Center on Health Outcomes at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University.

Recommended Citation: HealthVoices: "Health Literacy - A Key to Better Health for Georgians", Julie Gazmararian, PhD, Kara Jacobson, MPH, David Howard, Phd, Emory Center on Health Outcomes, Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University, Healthcare Georgia Foundation,Publication #14, January 2007

HealthVoices: Georgia's Medicaid Program: A Briefing for Community Leaders

Georgia is considering changes to the state's Medicaid program that may have significant effects on the availability of affordable, quality health care for low income Georgians. The state is planning to seek a broad waiver of current federal Medicaid regulations, known as a Section 1115 waiver.

This policy brief is designed to serve as a primer for policymakers, community leaders, and health care providers who will be assessing the benefits and costs of changes to Georgia's Medicaid program. It provides basic facts on the Medicaid program, explores key features of Section 1115 waivers and poses questions for policymakers to consider when evaluating proposals to change Georgia's Medicaid program.

The Summary Tables, Methods and Procedures, and data files can found here.


Recommended Citation: HealthVoices: "Georgia's Medicaid Program: A Briefing for Community Leaders", Joan Alker, M. Phil, Center for Children and Families, Health Policy Institute, Georgetown University, Timothy Sweeney, MPA, Georgia Budget and Policy Institute, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Publication #10, May 2005

HealthVoices: Addressing Overweight: Let Georgia Lead the Way

Georgia's children risk being the first generation to live sicker and die younger than their parents according to a recent study commissioned by Healthcare Georgia Foundation and conducted by the University of Georgia Survey Research Center. In this issue of HealthVoices, we examine the perceptions that Georgia residents have on ways to address childhood overweight and physical inactivity in Georgia. More than half of the survey respondents support several approaches to financing physical education and improved nutrition programs in schools: an earmarked increase in alcohol and tobacco taxes, special 1% sales tax, offering after school programs paid for by parents, and increasing school property taxes.

For more information on Healthcare Georgia Foundation's 2004 Childhood Overweight and Physical Inactivity Survey conducted by the University of Georgia Survey Research Center, please click here.


Recommended Citation: HealthVoices: "Addressing Overweight: Let Georgia Lead the Way", The Survey Research Center at the University of Georgia, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Publication #9, April 2005

HealthVoices: Addressing Overweight: The Role of Physical Activity in Schools

Georgians and health experts agree - childhood overweight is a serious health problem that demands action. School-based physical activity is one key component in promoting healthy weight in young children. This policy brief from Healthcare Georgia Foundation recommends physical activity in schools, identifies the elements of successful school-based physical activity, and summarizes the science behind these recommendations. The brief was prepared by Policy Leadership for Active Youth (PLAY), a three-year initiative of Georgia State University's Institute of Public Health in partnership with the Georgia Center for Obesity and Related Disorders (GCORD) of the University of Georgia and the Medical College of Georgia. Data from Healthcare Georgia Foundation's statewide public opinion poll on Georgians' views on childhood overweight and physical activity is also featured in the brief.

Supporting documentation for the brief can be found here:

School-based Physical Activity Interventions to Prevent or Treat Childhood Overweight
(A Summary of Research and Findings)


Reference Notes for HealthVoices


Recommended Citation: HealthVoices: "Addressing Overweight: The Role of Physical Activity in Schools", Policy Leadership for Active Youth (PLAY), a three year policy initiative of Georgia State University Institute of Public Health, in partnership with the Georgia Center for Obesity and Related Disorders (GCORD) and the University of Georgia and the Medical College of Georgia, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Publication #7, January 2005

HealthVoices: Economic and Health Benefits of Tobacco Taxes for Georgians

Is a catalyst for better health and health care in Georgia, Healthcare Georgia Foundation helped support an independent economic analysis of the 2003 tobacco tax increase by the Fiscal Research Center (FRC) of the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University. The analysis shows that the 2003 tax increase, the first in 32 years, will deter Georgians from smoking and will generate substantial revenue for the state. If Georgia enacted an additional tax increase of 21 cents per pack, it would have significant economic and health benefits as well.

Recommended Citation: HealthVoices: "Economic and Health Benefits of Tobacco Taxes for Georgians", The Fiscal Research Center in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies of Georgia State University, Healthcare Georgia Foundation,Publication #5, March 2004

HealthVoices: Georgians Speak Out on Health Care and Prevention

In its role as a catalyst for better health and health care, Healthcare Georgia Foundation conducted the 2003 Access to Coverage and Prevention Survey. Twelve hundred Georgians were polled statewide to learn their views on their health care insurance and preventive services along with their willingness to pay for better community health services. The Foundation published the results of the poll in its inaugural issue of HealthVoices - a publication intended to be an educational service to Georgians interested in health policy.

Recommended Citation: HealthVoices: "Georgians Speak Out on Health Care and Prevention", The Survey Research Center at the University of Georgia, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Publication #4, November 2003